Curl Talk: Straight Cut Vs Curly Cut

In my few short years of wearing my curly natural hair, I noticed a sort of war in ideology and technique of an important part of natural hair styling. I would go so far as to say that this polarization in preferred technique rivals that of the Butterside Up or Butterside Down dispute!

This debate centers around the best way to cut curly hair. Do you straighten it first and then rewet it to get the desired style? Do you cut it in its curly, product free state and then wash and style? Hair dressers all swear by their method of curling hair but does it really matter? Of course it does!  As of last year, I've now tried both methods and I'm going to give the pros and cons of each. How you get your hair cut is up to you and everyone has a different preference.

Straight/dry cut:A straight cut is when the stylist washes your hair, blows the hair out straight with a hair dryer and sometimes does a light pass with the flat iron to see where the ends need to be trimmed. If desired, the stylist can rewet your hair and style as a wash and go.

Curl Talk: Straight Cut Vs Curly Cut
Curl Talk: Straight Cut Vs Curly Cut

Yays:

  • Straight cuts are good if you already have or want layers in your hair. When you cut the hair straight, its easier to make sure the hair is even so that you can wear it curly or straight.
  • If you have several different textures of hair (the back of my hair is very tightly coiled while the front of my hair is like an s curl or loose wave) then straight cuts, in my opinion, also help to make sure you retain length. the stylist is able to trim spilt ends of the longest layer and then cut the rest of the layers in relation to the longest back layer. This way, you don't run the risk of over-cutting due to shrinkage.
  • Your hair will look good straight or curly, and this method usually allows for the stylist to do what's known as a "universal front" cut so that you can part it on either side or down the middle.
  • Easier for the stylist to spot the dead ends.

Booos:

  • This method does involve putting heat on your hair (Read: risk of heat damage). However, if your stylist is good about apply heat protectant and leave-in and generally just does one pass of the flat iron, you should be okay.
  • If you don't have an experienced stylist, you could end up cutting way more hair than you intended to get your layers.
  • Personally, I find that its hard to do twist outs or twist styles since the ends are two even to lock the twist. But the twistout shape is great.
Curl Talk: Straight Cut Vs Curly Cut
Curl Talk: Straight Cut Vs Curly Cut

Curly cut: A curly cut, often referred to as the Devacut method, involves starting on clean, product free dry hair in its curly state. The idea is to see how your curls naturally shrink and frame your face and cut accordingly. Your stylist will usually then put you under the sink again, add product and send you on your way.

Yays:

  • If the Wash and Go is your go to style, this might be the best cut technique for you since the technique is centered around your natural curl pattern and shrinkage.
  • No potential for heat damage unless you desire to stretch the hair after washing. Even then, very minimal.
  • In my experience, its a much quicker salon trip! You can be in and out in an hour, even with long thick hair.

Booos:

  • Your hair will be uneven if you straighten or stretch. It might even be uneven while curly if your pattern differs by hemisphere and you don't stretch the roots.
  • Its not as easy to spot all the dead ends. Its even harder to trim all the dead ends with out hacking everything.
  • Devacut trained stylists require you to come with your hair freshly washed with little to no product. Me, personally, I go to the salon so that I don't have to do my hair myself so this might not be a con for everyone, but #AintNobodyGotTimeForThat

After undergoing both, I think I'm going to stick with dry straight cuts for a while. I'm more of a twistout girl and only get my hair trimmed when my ends are begging to be let go. Which do you prefer?